I had a little time this evening and decided to scan through the Darwin Awards.  This is an interesting site if one wants to consider the abject stupidity of fellow humans.  One entry caught my eye. “…Communist Romania. At the time, it was mandatory for all children, including university students, to boost the economy by ‘active participation.”  Note that in communist Romania, the government was not exempt from the philosophy of money.  That is: money is a representation of work and value.  One obtains money by trading their labor for it, or engaging in commerce with those who have traded their time and efforts for it.  I put it in that fashion as there are those who earn money by building a house, and those who earn money by selling that same house.  Those who believe in Keynesian economics consider the latter individual and believe the economy is run by trade.  The ignored portion is that there has to be a formation prior to the trade.  The forced labor used in Romania is the unspoken declaration by a communist government that work is required for them to obtain wealth.  After all, the government cannot remove money from nothing.  Labor has to be utilized, and then the results can be removed from the individual.

In our county, mrs. zero let that concept slip in a campaign speech on another idea, but it was presented and still available as a reminder.  I spent a little time looking for the associated material and found it here.  Again, money cannot be taken for the government use, unless individuals are worked and the results of that labor are taken.  My impression is that our economy is still going well enough that zero can’t go there yet.  I anticipate a future time when he will reiterate the presently ignored requirements of Bill Clinton’s welfare reform and say that people are required to “contribute something” towards the country that has helped them so far.  We are not to that point, but by my way of thinking, that will be the manner to get this country to the labor participation described in communist Romania.

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