In Genesis, there is a tale about life after the flood.  There was only one family of people populating the land, and they had grown in numbers such that they had a king and society.  With the flood in memory, they decided to build a tower.  The purpose of this was to prevent any further catastrophe, like the flood, from destroying them.  One way of describing it would be a fist in the face – “we are going to do this any nothing you do will stop us.”  God had an interesting response to this as follows:

But the Lord came down to see the city and the tower the people were building. The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.”

So the Lord scattered them from there over all the earth, and they stopped building the city. That is why it was called Babel[c]—because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.

There is a principle here which has been used positively or negatively in families, groups, and countries since that time.  One phrase describing a group of people in concert stands out to me: “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them.”  A group, working together, has incredible potential, so much that God stated that nothing will be impossible for them.

God’s response to the fist in His face action was to alter the languages and make it difficult to communicate.  My interpretation of this is a bit more than the words read.   I see this to mean that the intents of the individuals were altered so that working together would be difficult.  The end result of the tale was that people scattered over the earth.  The result of my interpretation is that individuals engaged in more political actions to express or exert their will over others.   I will continue with further thoughts later.

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